Funding

Photo: iStock, Mariusz Blach

Grants Available

Our annual intake of grant applications is now open. All grant applications are due Friday, October 25, 2019, by 5 p.m. PDT.

We fund projects that align with priorities in our regional Action Plans. The FWCP has posted more than 1800 final reports on provincial databases, making our project results and data available to anyone. Before developing your grant application, review our project report list for relevant work already completed. If there is a relevant project report, consider how, or if the work you propose in your grant application will build on past work. See searchable spreadsheets for all final project reports.

Coastal Action Plans

            Columbia Action Plans

Peace Action Plans

Click to enlarge our annual grant intake and project cycle below.

You're Invited

Join a free online information session and learn more about our grants and Action Plans.

All Regions: Learn about our grants and regional Action Plans on Wed. October 2, 2019 at 10 a.m. PDT.

Register for information sessions at fwcp@bchydro.com.

Peace Region: Review slides from our August 21 Notice of Intent information session.
Peace Region NOI Info Session presentation

Manage Your Grant

If you were approved for a grant in 2019–2020, use this link to manage your current grant.

Manage your grant: read our User Guides for Submitting a Change Request, Submitting a Progress ReportSubmitting a Progress or Final Statement of Account Task, and Submitting a Draft Final Report.

Manage my grant

Apply For a Grant

Read our information kit for grant applicants and our FAQs. Review our regional grant requirements and guidance.

Peace Region grant applicants must submit a mandatory Notice of Intent by Monday, Sept. 9, 2019. All grant applications are due by 5 p.m. PDT on Friday, Oct. 25, 2019.

Use the button below to open our online grant management system and start your 2019 FWCP grant application.

 

 

Start grant application

FAQ

What is the FWCP?

The Fish & Wildlife Compensation Program (FWCP) is a partnership between BC Hydro, the Province of B.C, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, First Nations, and Public Stakeholders to conserve and enhance fish and wildlife in watersheds impacted by existing BC Hydro dams.

Why does FWCP fund projects?

The FWCP was established to compensate for impacts to fish, wildlife, and their supporting habitat, resulting from the construction of existing BC Hydro dams.

BC Hydro has water licence obligations in the Columbia and Peace regions, and has made voluntary commitments to address the impacts of dams in the Coastal Region. BC Hydro fulfills the applicable obligations through the work of the FWCP.

The FWCP is funded annually by BC Hydro. The FWCP directs those funds towards projects that address priority actions across its three regions to fulfill its mission, and work towards its vision of thriving fish and wildlife populations in watersheds that are functioning and sustainable.

Who decides what projects get FWCP funding?

We fund projects that align with our Action Plans, which reflect regional conservation priorities and priority actions. An independent Board in each region reviews all grant applications and project funding decisions. Our Boards include representatives from BC Hydro, the Province of B.C., Fisheries and Oceans Canada, First Nations and Public Stakeholders.

Learn more about our grants and projects we fund, subscribe at fwcp.ca/subscribe.

How is the FWCP funded?

The Fish & Wildlife Compensation Program (FWCP) conserves and enhances fish and wildlife in watersheds impacted by BC Hydro dams. The FWCP is funded annually by BC Hydro. The FWCP directs those funds towards priority actions across its three regions to fulfill its mission and work towards its vision of thriving fish and wildlife populations in watersheds that are functioning and sustainable.

By funding projects to support fish and wildlife populations in our Coastal, Columbia and Peace Regions, the FWCP is fulfilling BC Hydro’s applicable water licence obligations and voluntary commitments to compensate for fish and wildlife impacts.

What does the FWCP fund?

We fund and support the following types of actions, which are consistent with our mandate:

  1. actions to create, restore, or otherwise improve the function of ecosystems that have been impacted by BC Hydro activities;
  2. actions to create, restore, or otherwise improve the function of alternate ecosystems that provide a better opportunity for investment;
  3. specific management actions for species of interest, as identified by recovery teams and action/implementation groups;
  4. baseline inventories that contribute to the development of habitat- or species-based actions within our Action Plans;
  5. monitoring programs designed to measure the effectiveness of FWCP-funded habitat and species actions;
  6. actions that contribute to all aspects of managing co-operatively managed conservation lands; and
  7. participation as a team member in species of interest planning.

What does the FWCP NOT fund?

We do not fund or support the following activities, which are beyond our mandate:

  1. core activities of government or non-government agencies or programs (i.e. if the proposed project is being undertaken to inform a specific regulatory or legislative requirement, it is considered a core activity of government);
  2. programs designed exclusively to address government harvest objectives;
  3. policy development related to land or wildlife management;
  4. administration of government regulations;
  5. leading the development of species recovery goals;
  6. funding, coordinating, or leading National Recovery Teams for species at risk; and
  7. engaging in enforcement and compliance activities, except in relation to co-operatively managed conservation lands.

When are grant applications due?

Our annual intake of grant applications opens Wednesday, August 7, 2019. Grant applications are due Friday, October 25, 2019, by 5 p.m. PDT. All grant applicants must apply online at fwcp.ca/apply-for-funding. We do not accept grant applications by email or Canada Post.

If you are applying for a grant in our Peace Region, you must submit a mandatory Notice of Intent (NOI) by Monday, September 9, 2019.

Subscribe at fwcp.ca/subscibe and we will keep you posted when the 2020 dates are finalized.

What projects are eligible for a grant?

Actions identified in our Action Plans are eligible for an FWCP grant. Our Action Plans define priority actions for each watershed or sub-region, and reflect our mission, geographic scope, and three strategic objectives:

  1. conservation;
  2. community engagement; and
  3. sustainable use.

The Action Plans also provide important context about hydro-generating facilities, information gaps, limiting factors, and other information to characterize the watershed or sub-region.

Within our Action Plans, priority actions are grouped by five broad types:

  1. habitat-based actions;
  2. species-based actions;
  3. research and information acquisition actions;
  4. monitoring and evaluation actions; and
  5. land securement.

Our Action Plans also identify how important each action is to us (i.e. priority #1, #2, or #3). A priority #1 action will score higher than a priority #2 or #3 action, when grant applications are evaluated. Actions identified as “directed” are not eligible for a grant. These are projects that our regional Boards will direct through a separate request for proposal process. Do not submit a grant application for a “directed” project. Contact us if you are not sure.

Grant applications for projects that do not clearly address a priority action identified in an Action Plan will not be considered for an FWCP grant.

Where are the Action Plans?

Our Action Plans guide FWCP investments in fish and wildlife projects, and are referenced annually by our regional Boards to track progress toward implementation, set annual priorities, and guide decision-making in setting out and approving the Annual Operating Plan for each region. Actions in our Action Plans are eligible for FWCP funding and align with our vision, mission, and geographic scope.

Each region has its own set of Action Plans and associated priorities.

Coastal Region Watershed Action Plans

Columbia Region Action Plans

Peace Region Basin and Action Plans

What are the Coastal Region grant requirements?

The FWCP funds projects in its Coastal, Columbia and Peace Regions that align with its regional Action Plans. Requirements and guidance for grant applicants vary by region. This FAQ will outline the requirements and guidance for all Coastal Region grant applicants.

Review our Coastal Region Action Plans

Action Plans for the 14 watersheds that make up our Coastal Region are online. These Action Plans identify our conservation priorities and actions eligible for an FWCP grant.

2019 Coastal Region priorities

The Coastal Region Board is interested in funding priority actions in each of the 14 watersheds that make up our Coastal Region, especially actions identified as priority #1.

Follow the fish passage framework

If you are applying for a grant to evaluate opportunities to improve fish passage and restore fish production above BC Hydro facilities, you are required to work through the Fish Passage Decision Framework. Grant applicants are encouraged to contact BC Hydro at Katy.Jay@bchydro.com for support in working through the Fish Passage Decision Framework.

NEW Follow our Campbell River Gravel Restoration Strategy

The main stem Campbell River is important for spawning Chinook Salmon. In 2018, the FWCP funded a multi-stakeholder process to develop a strategy for salmon spawning habitat enhancement and monitoring in the Lower Campbell River. The Campbell River Gravel Strategy identifies priority spawning sites for restoration.

If you are proposing a project for gravel monitoring (priority action #23), or salmon spawning habitat restoration (priority action #13), in the Lower Campbell River it must align with this strategy. Contact our Coastal Region Manager for more information.

NEW Research and information projects must inform conservation actions

The Coastal Region Board wants to strengthen the link between research and information gathering projects and the FWCP’s conservation and sustainable use objectives:

Conservation:                   Maintain productive and diverse ecosystems

Maintain or improve the status of species of interest

Sustainable Use:              Maintain or improve opportunities for sustainable use

Grant applications that are forward looking and clearly demonstrate how results from the proposed research and information gathering project will benefit future conservation actions, or inform decisions to conserve and enhance the watershed, will receive a more favourable evaluation by reviewers than grant applications that do not.

Grant applications must describe how the proposed project will address data gaps to better understand limiting factors, inform a decision leading to a conservation action, or address a specific land use or recovery plan.

Applicants are strongly encouraged to correlate how the work will benefit fish, wildlife or ecosystems in the watershed. For example, proposals for inventories or assessments of a species of interest should:

  1. correlate the data collected to a clearly identified resource management objective or conservation action (e.g. land use plan, recovery plan etc.);
  2. describe how the data addresses knowledge gaps identified in 1) above; and
  3. describe how the proposed project will inform next steps to improve, or clarify a management objective.

The grant application should confirm (via a support letter from the appropriate resource manager), that there is a need for and an interest in, the proposed research and in using the results to further conservation efforts.

NEW Review relevant projects reports and outcomes

Before developing your grant application, review our project report list for relevant work already completed. If there is a relevant project report, consider how, or if the work you propose in your grant application will build on past work. The FWCP has posted more than 500 final reports on provincial databases, making our project results and data available to anyone. A searchable spreadsheet for all Coastal Region final project reports is available at http://fwcp.ca/results/.

Contact us if you are proposing a project near select reservoirs

If you are proposing a project in the Ash, Campbell, Jordan, or Puntledge River watersheds, you MUST contact our Coastal Region Manager, Julie Fournier, at julie.fournier@bchydro.com or 604-528-7998, prior to submitting your grant application. There are large private land holdings in each of these watersheds, and as a result there is an additional project screening process.

Submit letters of support for Large Grants

Mandatory letters of support are required for all Large Grant applications (i.e., projects with a total cost of more than $20,000). A letter of support is required from:

  1. a government agency;
  2. a First Nation; and
  3. a stakeholder/community group.

Letters of support for seed or small grants are optional and may be used to strengthen your grant application.

Projects must be within our Coastal Region watersheds

We fund projects to be delivered within the boundaries of the 14 watersheds that make up our Coastal Region.

What are the Columbia Region grant requirements?

NEW Align grant applications with our updated 2019 Action Plans

Updated 2019 Columbia Region Action Plans are now available. Our 2019 Action Plans define the Priority Actions eligible for FWCP funding. Anyone applying for an FWCP grant must clearly demonstrate how the proposed project aligns with Priority Actions identified in our updated 2019 Action Plans.

Our 2012 Columbia Region Action Plans have been archived for reference only and no longer provide current guidance on our priorities or projects eligible for an FWCP grant. Do not refer to our archived 2012 Action Plans when developing your project idea and submitting a grant application.

North Columbia projects are a priority

The FWCP’s Columbia Region Board is encouraging grant applications for proposed projects to be delivered within the northern portion of the FWCP’s Columbia Region (i.e. North Columbia sub-region), which is bordered by Revelstoke and Golden in the south, and Valemount in the north. See Columbia Region map. Proposed projects in this sub-region must align with priorities in updated 2019 Columbia Region Action Plans.

Follow our guidance for fisheries projects in our Columbia Region

If you are proposing a fisheries project in our Columbia Region, please review the Columbia Region Annual Ongoing Fisheries Program Five-Year Plan (2018 – 2023) to ensure your proposal does not duplicate activities already planned. Applications for projects that duplicate the FWCP’s annual and ongoing fisheries projects will not be considered for funding.

NEW Follow our guidance for contacting First Nations

The FWCP is committed to strengthening and evolving its partnership with First Nations and encourages grant applicants to engage with the appropriate First Nations about proposed projects prior to submitting a grant application.

Early engagement with First Nations can help identify options for project support or direct involvement, including:

  1. Level of involvement: FWCP encourages meaningful involvement of First Nations to strengthen and maintain relationships with First Nations. FWCP has defined four types of relationships or support by First Nations:
    • Financial or in-kind support – A First Nation contributes funds or in-kind services that increase the total value of the project;
    • Support in principle – A First Nation provides a letter of support for the project but is not directly involved in the project;
    • Working relationship – Budgeted involvement in the project (e.g. First Nations’ technicians employed through the project).
    • Project development support – A First Nation contributes to project development and implementation.
  2. First Nations priorities’ and values: Discuss specific priorities and values for the First Nations and identify how this information can be incorporated into the project scope.
  3. Community activity timelines: Discuss the timelines of the project activities relative to traditional, cultural, or community activities, and how to ensure there is no conflict between activities.
  4. Indigenous knowledge: Discuss if there are opportunities to incorporate Indigenous knowledge into the project scope.
  5. Employment approach: Discuss preferred approach to hiring First Nations’ members who may be involved in the project and determine appropriate daily rates for First Nations (e.g. hiring members on an individual basis or hiring through the First Nation or a First Nation-owned company).

Contact, Crystal Klym, our Columbia Region Manager, at crystal.klym@bchydro.com or 250-365-4591 for more information.

NEW Review relevant projects reports and outcomes

Before developing your grant application, review our project report list for relevant work already completed. If there is a relevant project report, consider how, or if the work you propose in your grant application will build on past work. The FWCP has posted more than 500 final reports on provincial databases, making our project results and data available to anyone. A searchable spreadsheet for all Columbia Region final project reports is available at http://fwcp.ca/results/.

Letters of support are optional

Letters of support for your project are optional in our Columbia Region but can be used to strengthen your grant application. If you choose to submit letters of support along with your grant application, please ensure the letter author(s) clearly indicate their support for your proposed project and specify their involvement (i.e., actively involved or engaged in project planning and/or delivery; providing in-kind and/or cash support; supports the project in principle).

Projects must be within our Columbia Region

We fund projects to be delivered within the boundaries of our Columbia Region, which includes the Canadian portion of the Columbia River Basin, plus our wildlife extension area (northwest of Valemount). The Canadian portion of the Flathead River Basin is not part of our Columbia Region.

What are the Peace Region grant requirements?

The FWCP funds projects in its Coastal, Columbia and Peace Regions that align with its regional Action Plans. Requirements and guidance for grant applicants vary by region. This FAQ outlines the requirements and guidance for all Peace Region grant applicants.

Review our Peace Region Basin & Action Plans

Our Peace Region Action Plans identify priorities and actions eligible for an FWCP grant. Our Peace Basin Plan defines priorities for potential stewardship and education projects. This project type is unique to our Peace Region. Potential stewardship and education projects would have a high educational, volunteer, and/or community engagement component.

Submit your mandatory Notice of Intent by September 9, 2019

If you are applying for a fish or wildlife grant in our Peace Region, you must submit a mandatory Notice of Intent (NOI) by Monday, September 9, 2019, by 5 p.m. PDT.

The NOI is an important part of our commitment to First Nations. It helps inform First Nations about your proposed project and is the basis for identifying opportunities for First Nations’ perspectives and involvement in your project. The NOI helps our Peace Region Manager, Chelsea Coady, provide you with additional guidance before completing your grant application.

Start your Peace Region online grant application at fwcp.ca/apply-for-funding, and follow the instructions to complete and submit your Notice of Intent.

Contact Chelsea Coady, Peace Region Manager, to discuss your grant application anytime: chelsea.coady@bchydro.com or 250-561-4884.

Follow our guidance for contacting First Nations

Your NOI will be reviewed by our First Nations Working Group and you will receive notice by email advising you to contact specific First Nations in our Peace Region to discuss your proposed project.

  1. We expect your initial contact with specific First Nations will occur well in advance of the grant application deadline (i.e. within one week of receiving written notice of the First Nations you have been directed to contact).
  2. Initial contact will be via email and include the following information clearly and concisely:
  • map of project location;
  • an overview of the project’s expected objectives or research questions (one to two sentences);
  • a summary paragraph outlining your proposed approach and timelines (three to four sentences); and
  • your initial intentions for First Nations involvement in your project (two to three sentences).

When you hear back from your First Nations’ contacts, use these points to guide your next discussion:

  1. First Nations priorities’ and values: Discuss specific priorities and values for the First Nations and identify how this information can be incorporated into the project scope.
  2. Community activity timelines: Discuss the timelines of the project activities relative to traditional, cultural, or community activities, and how to ensure there is no conflict between activities.
  3. Traditional knowledge: Discuss if there are opportunities to incorporate traditional and local knowledge into the project scope.
  4. Training opportunities: Discuss and determine First Nations’ training opportunities related to the project (e.g. electrofishing certification). Costs associated with First Nations’ training can be included as a budget line item in the project application.
  5. Employment approach: Discuss preferred approach to hiring First Nations’ members who may be involved in the project and determine appropriate daily rates for First Nations (e.g. hiring members on an individual basis or hiring through the First Nation or a First Nation-owned company).
  6. Level of involvement: FWCP encourages meaningful involvement of First Nations to strengthen and maintain relationships with First Nations. FWCP has defined four types of relationships or support by First Nations:
      • Financial or in-kind support

    – A First Nation contributes funds or in-kind services that increase the total value of the project;

      • Support in principle

    – A First Nation provides a letter of support for the project but is not directly involved in the project;

      • Working relationship

    – Budgeted involvement in the project (e.g. First Nations’ technicians employed through the project).

      • Project development support

    – A First Nation contributes to project development and implementation.

When completing your online grant application, you will be required to indicate the level of First Nation involvement in your project.

 Follow our guidance for Arctic Grayling projects

The FWCP funds Arctic Grayling projects that align with our 2017 Arctic Grayling synthesis report and monitoring framework. These documents identify high-priority information gaps and monitoring needs related to Arctic Grayling. These monitoring needs must be undertaken prior to funding on-the-ground conservation and enhancement projects, and include:

  1. acquiring population data;
  2. identifying critical habitats; and
  3. assessing potential limiting factors.

Grant applications for projects to conserve and enhance Arctic Grayling in our Peace Region must align with our Streams Action Plan (Actions 1b-3 and 1b-4), and the monitoring needs in the synthesis report and monitoring framework.

NEW Follow our guidance for Bull Trout projects

The FWCP funds Bull Trout projects that align with our 2019 Bull Trout information synthesis and monitoring framework report. The synthesis and monitoring framework report will be available in August 2019. The synthesis identifies Bull Trout biology and limiting factors, potential enhancement opportunities, conservation status and risks, and critical habitats across the FWCP’s Peace Region. The monitoring framework provides a recommended sequence of monitoring actions (i.e. priorities) based on data gaps to guide FWCP proponents in developing studies focussed on key monitoring data requirements to enable effective conservation and enhancement actions. Monitoring actions identified in the synthesis report and monitoring framework focus on:

  1. population data indicating conservation status and risk;
  2. information delineating critical habitats;
  3. information indicating potential limiting factors; and
  4. information about the effectiveness of enhancements.

Grant applications for projects to conserve and enhance Bull Trout in our Peace Region must align with our Streams Action Plan (Actions 1c-2, 1c-3and 1c-4), and the monitoring needs in the information synthesis and monitoring framework report.

NEW Follow our guidance for wetland and riparian area projects

Draft Predictive Riparian and Wetland Habitat Mapping is now available to support grant applications for proposed projects to create, restore or enhance and riparian and wetland habitats.

A recent project funded by FWCP and led by Ministry of Environment and Climate Change Strategy, resulted in a draft predictive wetland riparian habitat model that identifies wetland and riparian habitats across the ~ 70,000 km2 FWCP Peace Region. The draft predictive model, associated spatial files, and final report are available online and support priority actions 1a-1 and 1b-1 of the FWCP Peace Riparian and Wetlands Action Plan.

If your grant application is about creating, restoring or enhancing riparian or wetland habitat, please review the draft model and mapping products to support scoping your proposed project and align your proposed project with one or more priority actions in our FWCP Peace Region Riparian and Wetlands Action Plan:

Priority Action 2a-2 – Install water control structures to regulate water levels in existing wetlands

Priority action 2b-1 – Leverage Water Licence Requirements trial wetland program to create habitat

  • Projects to create or enhance riparian and/or wetland habitat would be eligible under this Priority Action. The wetland creation project sponsored by BC Hydro Water Use Planning conducted in the Parsnip sub-region (Golder Associates 2010) includes recommendations to create new wetland and riparian habitat (e.g.  Sites 15 and 16: unnamed) and enhance existing wetland and riparian habitats (e.g. Site 6-2 Airport Lagoon) within the FWCP’s Peace Region.

Priority Action 2b-2 – Install artificial nesting or roost structures for wildlife species

  • Examples of previous FWCP-funded projects to enhance wetlands that align with this priority action can be found in Ecofor 2015.

Priority Action 3a-1 – Help protect riparian and wetland ecosystems from invasive plants

  • This action could be a component of a larger enhancement project. Partnering with local invasive plant committees is encouraged to support prioritizing areas for restoration/enhancement.

Please contact our Peace Region Manager Chelsea.Coady@bchydro.com for more information related to this guidance or the draft predictive riparian and wetland habitat mapping products available. We are  updating our Action Plans in 2020, so riparian and wetland priorities will be further refined at that time

Follow our guidance for fish passage restoration projects

The Peace Region Board acknowledges that fish passage restoration projects are a significant investment, therefore, the Board encourages grant applications for restoration projects where an initial investment (e.g. initial planning and assessment phases) has occurred and/or where investment by others is demonstrated.

Grant applications for fish passage restoration projects should consider and demonstrate the following:

  1. demonstrate your project follows the four-phased approach outlined in the provincial Fish Passage Strategic Approach: Protocol for Prioritizing Sites for Fish Passage Remediation
  2. demonstrate that the stream crossing(s) you would restore through your project does not have current ownership and is “orphaned.” Note: This does not exclude opportunities for FWCP investment in a project to remediate a length of stream with crossings that have orphaned status, and other crossings that have current ownership. In this scenario, other funding would be required for the restoration for the currently- owned crossings (i.e. FWCP funds will not be approved for crossings that are currently owned)
  3. demonstrate partnerships and participation with stakeholders, the provincial Fish Passage Technical Working Group, and First Nations;
  4. demonstrate leveraged funding to increase the value of the FWCP investment (i.e. other in-kind and cash contributions);
  5. demonstrate the quantity and value of the habitat that will be gained by the project and the species that will benefit (e.g. X kms, for which species, and the type of habitat available above the obstruction). Note: The Fish Passage Technical Working Group should be contacted to determine access to the province’s GIS modeling approach to assess fish habitat
  6. identify the priority for fish passage restoration within the proposed location (e.g. species of interest presence, overall benefit to the watershed, etc.); and
  7. consider lower cost options to improve fish passage (e.g. implementing baffles to backwater culverts) in lieu of implementing culvert replacement projects if supported by the Fish Passage Technical Working Group.

NEW Review relevant projects reports and outcomes

Before developing your grant application, review our project report list for relevant work already completed. If there is a relevant project report, consider how, or if the work you propose in your grant application will build on past work. The FWCP has posted more than 500 final reports on provincial databases, making our project results and data available to anyone. A searchable spreadsheet for all Coastal Region final project reports is available at http://fwcp.ca/results/.

Letters of support are optional

Letters of support for your project are optional in our Peace Region but can be used to strengthen your grant application. If you choose to submit letters of support along with your grant application, please ensure the letter author(s) clearly indicate their support for your proposed project and specify their involvement (i.e., actively involved or engaged in project planning and/or delivery; providing in-kind and/or cash support; supports the project in principle).

Projects must occur within, or relate to, our Peace Region

We fund projects to be delivered within the boundaries of our Peace Region. We may fund projects that only partially overlap with our region boundary if the project is related to a species that moves across the regional boundary (e.g. caribou herds). Additionally, projects with a strong community engagement or stewardship and education focus could have some, but not all, project components outside of our regional boundary. These projects must still demonstrate they are addressing a priority action in a Peace Region Action Plan.

Who can apply for an FWCP grant?

Any group, government agency, First Nation, business, or individual that can meet our mandatory requirements (e.g. WorkSafeBC and commercial general liability insurance) is eligible to receive an FWCP grant. In the past, First Nations, municipal, provincial, or federal agencies, stewardship groups, consultants, and educational institutions have been approved for FWCP grants.

What grants are available?

We offer three different grants for fish and wildlife projects.

  1. Seed Grant

Our Seed Grant is available if you have a project idea and need financial support to further develop it before submitting a Large Grant application. Seed Grant funding is intended to offset costs to fill information gaps, explore project feasibility, and prepare technical information. Use our Seed Grant to grow your idea into a future Large Grant application. Up to a maximum of $5,000 is available from the FWCP.

  1. Small Grant

Our Small Grant is available for projects that align with our Action Plans and have a total project cost of less than $20,000. The total project cost includes funding from all sources including, but not limited to, the FWCP, other funders (if any), the total value of all in-kind contributions (if any), and applicable taxes. Your Small Grant application does not require a written project proposal.

  1. Large Grant

Our Large Grant is available for projects that align with our Action Plans and have a total project cost of more than $20,000. The total project cost includes funding from all sources including, but not limited to, the FWCP, other funders (if any), and the total value of all in-kind contributions (if any), and applicable taxes. Your Large Grant application must include a written project proposal (maximum six pages).

 

How do I apply for a grant?

We use an online grant management system to manage all aspects of your FWCP grant, starting with your grant application. Access our online grant management system at https://fwcp.smartsimple.ca/

Follow these steps:
1. Review the regional Action Plans of interest to you.
2. Review and comply with applicable regional requirements and guidance.
3. Develop a project idea to fulfill an action in any Action Plan(s);
4. Login to our online grant management system at fwcp.ca/apply-for-funding
5. Complete your mandatory Notice of Intent by Monday September 9, 2019, 5 p.m. PDT (Peace Region only);
6. Start your online grant application;
7. Fulfill all mandatory grant application requirements; and
8. Submit your grant application by Friday, October 25, 2019, 5 p.m. PDT.

 

1. Review regional Action Plans
A series of Action Plans define Priority Actions eligible for an FWCP grant in each of our three regions. Decisions about what grant applications and projects are approved, are guided by these Action Plans (i.e. we fund projects that align with our Action Plans).

Please review the Action Plan(s) in the region(s) of interest to you. Base your grant application for a potential project on any one, or more, of the actions recommended in our regional Action Plans.

Coastal and Peace Region Action Plans are online at:
• Coastal Region fwcp.ca/region/coastal-region OR fwcp.ca/action-plans-coastal-region/
• Peace Region fwcp.ca/region/peace-region/ OR fwcp.ca/action-plans-peace-region/

NEW Columbia Region Action Plans
We are concluding updates to our Columbia Region Action Plans. Final, updated 2019 Columbia Region Action Plans will be available Wednesday, August 21, 2019. Earlier versions of Action Plans no longer provide current guidance on Priority Actions for our Columbia Region. Review our updated 2019 Action Plans before starting your grant application.

2. Review regional guidance and priorities
Requirements and priorities vary by region. Review our regional guidance, requirements, and priorities to ensure your project idea and grant application are in alignment.

Coastal Region guidance and priorities for 2019 grant applicants
Peace Region guidance and priorities for 2019 grant applicants

Columbia Region guidance and priorities for 2019 grant applicants will be posted, along with updated 2019 Columbia Region Action Plans, on Wednesday, August 21, 2019.

3. Develop a project idea to fulfill an action
Based on your knowledge and experience, consider how you might fulfill a priority action in one of our three regions. To help you develop a project idea, these are some of the questions we’ll ask as you to answer in your online grant application:
1. How does your project idea align with an Action Plan(s)?
2. Which Priority Action(s) would your project address?
3. Where would the work take place?
4. How would you go about the work?
5. What would the outcome be?
6. What species would benefit?
7. Would you need partners?
8. What would it cost?
9. How would you share the results and what you learned with others?

Our regional managers can help you align your project idea with one or more Priority Actions in our Action Plans, and our grant applications. Please contact us to talk about your project idea.

4. Login to our online grant management system and start grant application
All grant applicants must use our online grant management system to apply.

Coastal and Columbia Regions
If you’ve applied for an FWCP grant online before, you can login at fwcp.ca/apply-for-funding. If this is the first time you’ve applied online for an FWCP grant, you must register online at fwcp.ca/apply-for-funding.

Peace Region
If you’ve applied for an FWCP grant online before, you can login at fwcp.ca/apply-for-funding and start your mandatory Notice of Intent now. It is due by Monday, September 9, 2019 at 5 p.m. PDT. If this is the first time you’ve applied online for an FWCP grant, you must register online at fwcp.ca/apply-for-funding and then start your grant application, which begins with the mandatory Notice of Intent.

5. Complete mandatory Peace Region Notice of Intent
The mandatory Notice of Intent is due by 5 p.m. PDT on Monday September 9, 2019, for all Peace Region grant applications. If you are submitting a grant application in our Peace Region, our online grant management system will prompt you to complete and submit the mandatory Notice of Intent.

6. Start your online grant application
Follow the online instructions to start your grant application. There are lots of instructions in the online grant application, but if you need help, submit your questions online, email them to fwcp@bchydro.com or call 604-528-8136.

7. Fulfill all mandatory requirements
Be sure to complete all sections of the grant application and fulfil all mandatory requirements. These requirements vary by region. Review our regional guidance and priorities (See 2 above).

8. Submit your grant application by Friday, October 25, 2019, 5 p.m. PDT
The grant intake closes promptly at 5 p.m. PDT on Friday, Oct. 25, 2019. We accept and review grant applications received by the deadline. Avoid submitting your application immediately before the deadline in case you need to make corrections or additions. When you submit your grant application, the grant management system validates it to ensure required information has been provided. Allow time to correct any validation errors.

Helpful Tips
• Save time by asking us for a copy of your previous grant application. This is useful if you’re resubmitting an application, or if you are applying for subsequent years of a multi-year project.
• You can save your grant application and return to it anytime.
• The grant application is organized by key sections (see tabs in the online grant application), and you can complete the grant application in any order you wish.
• If your project spans multiple years, you must apply for one year of project funding at a time, even if your proposed project spans multiple years. You must apply for funding annually for proposed multi-year projects. Approval of annual FWCP funding for a multi-year project does not guarantee FWCP funding in future years.

When do I apply for a grant?

Our annual intake of grant applications opens Wednesday, August 7, 2019. Grant applications are due Friday, October 25, 2019 by 5 p.m. PDT.

What's in a grant application?

This FAQ provides an overview of our grant applications and what information you’ll be asked to provide.

Description

Project summary: project title, project summary statement, and project urgency.
Project details: species that will benefit, detailed project description.
Applicant information: proponent organization, project contact, signing authority, collaborators, project partners, project volunteers.

Project info

Project location information: location description, project coordinates (latitude and longitude).
Alignment with Action Plan(s): primary Action Plan, primary project type, priority action, how will project address priority action, secondary Action Plan alignment.
Single or multi-year project: define project duration, and provide overview of project achievements and challenges for ongoing multi-year projects.
Project phases: start-up, fieldwork, data entry and analysis, draft reporting, community engagement (i.e. define how you plan to share your project results and involve others in your proposed project?)
Benefits: benefits to fish or wildlife, benefits to First Nations, stakeholders, and/or communities.
Permits and approval: BC Hydro-owned lands, proximity to BC Hydro facility, landowners, required permits, and approvals.

Project budget

Budget: labour expenses, materials/equipment/transportation and field expenses, other funding sources, total project cost, total FWCP grant requested.
Funding: is this a resubmission of a previously “not approved” application? Have you previously received FWCP funding?

Proposal and letters of support

A six-page (maximum length) project proposal is required for Large Grant applications only; letters of support may be required (see regional requirements and guidance).

Experience

Project contact experience: it is mandatory to include the experience and credentials of the project contact. It is optional to include the credentials and experience of other team members.

How are grant applications reviewed and evaluated?

All grant applications go through a three-stage review process that ends with a final decision by each Regional Board about proposed projects in each of our three regions.

Stage 1            Review by Regional Manager
Each FWCP regional manager reviews grant applications to ensure they are complete and in alignment with priority actions in our Action Plans.

In our Peace Region, the First Nations Working Group (FNWG) reviews all Notices of Intent (NOI) received by the Monday, September 9, 2019 5 p.m. PDT, deadline. When this review is complete, the regional manager will advise all Peace Region grant applicants which First Nations they are expected to contact about the proposed project and any other applicable regional guidance.

Stage 2            Review by technical committees and First Nations Working Group 
Fish and wildlife technical committees in each region review each grant application for technical merit. In our Peace Region, the First Nations Working Group also evaluates grant applications for inclusion of traditional ecological knowledge, incorporation of First Nation cultural values, and involvement of First Nations in the proposed project, where appropriate.

Results from the technical committees and First Nations Working Group (Peace Region) review are provided to each Board to assist in their review and final decision-making in Stage 3.

Stage 3            Review by Board members
The three regional Boards review each grant application for projects proposed in their region. The Boards consider the results of all Stage 2 evaluations and make final decisions on which grant applications will be approved with conditions. The regional Boards evaluate the grant applications and are responsible for all project and funding decisions in each region.

How are grant applications evaluated?
During Stage 2 of our review process, the FWCP’s fish and wildlife Technical Committees in each region review all grant applications and evaluate them for:

  1. Alignment with the FWCP’s strategic objectives (e.g. conservation, sustainable use, and community engagement) and investment criteria.
  2. Alignment with priority actions in our Action Plans.
    • In each Action Plan, every action has been assigned a priority of #1 (highest), #2, or #3. During the evaluation of grant applications, a proposed project that aligns with a priority #1 action will be awarded more points, and a proposed project for a priority #2 or #3 action will receive fewer points.
  3. Conservation and enhancement of fish or wildlife that will result from the proposed project.
    4. Overall quality of the grant application.
    5. Technical merit, feasibility, and likelihood of success.
    6. Deliverables and project outcomes.
    7. Team qualifications and experience.
    8. Cost-effectiveness.
    9. Innovation and creativity.

In our Peace Region, our First Nations Working Group also reviews each grant application at Stage 2 and evaluates each one for:

  1. effective communication with First Nations about the proposed project prior to submitting a grant application;
  2. partnership, training, or participation opportunities; and
  3. recognition and inclusion of cultural values and traditional knowledge.

During Stage 3 of our review process, our Regional Boards review each grant application and consider the results of other evaluations, their evaluation of the grant application, and the balancing of priorities including, but not limited to, the:

  1. balance between projects that benefit primarily fish or wildlife;
  2. balance of projects between Action Plans;
  3. value of funding fewer high-cost, single-year projects or a several smaller-cost projects; and
  4. impact of multi-year funding on future year projects.

The Boards’ review and evaluation considers each grant application relative to the FWCP’s strategic objectives: conservation, sustainable use, and community engagement. Board members in each region review all grant applications and evaluate them for:

  1. the benefit of the proposed project to fish or wildlife, and ecosystems, impacted by BC Hydro dams;
  2. alignment with annual regional priorities or regional guidance;
    • Additional points will be awarded during the evaluation process to applications that address one or more of the three Columbia Region priorities.
  3. likelihood of improving or maintaining opportunities for sustainable use;
    4. overall value of the project including, but not limited to, partnerships with First Nations and other funding partners, in-kind contributions, and volunteers;
    5. engagement of First Nations, public, community and local stakeholders; and
    6. overall quality of the grant application.

What happens if my grant application is approved?

All grant applicants will be notified of Board decisions by March 2020.

If your grant application is approved, you will be notified in writing of all conditions that must be fulfilled before finalizing a contribution agreement, starting work on your proposed project, and receiving the first payment instalment. The conditions are determined by the regional Boards, and vary by grant application and proposed project.

All approved grant applicants will be required to fulfil our mandatory requirements (e.g. WorkSafeBC and general commercial liability coverage).

Grant applicants will be notified about our Boards’ funding decisions in February 2020.

97 Projects Underway Now

Our three regional boards – Coastal, Columbia, and Peace – approved funding for 97 fish and wildlife projects, valued at approximately $9.2 million, for 2019-2020. Each project went through a three-stage review and evaluation process prior to a final decision by our local Boards. Each project addresses one or more conservation priorities in our Action Plans. See our project map. Visit our inter-active project maps for our Coastal, Columbia and Peace regions.

Read our 2019 annual newsletter for project results and updates from each of our regions including projects funded in 2019-2020.

Learn more about why we’re funded by BC Hydro, the projects we fund, and how you can apply for a grant, by reading our FAQ’s below. Subscribe and we will keep you posted on project updates, results, grant deadlines and FWCP events. Final reports and results for all FWCP projects are posted online.

Community Engagement Grants

Our Community Engagement Grant is typically $500 to $1,000 and helps stewardship groups and others take action to benefit local fish and wildlife.

Looking For Other Funders?

We’re compiling information about other funding sources and will be sharing these opportunities. Please share your funding sources with us so we can pass them along to others who are working to conserve and enhance fish and wildlife.