Funding

Chinook Salmon Photo: iStock Supercaliphotolistic

118 Projects Approved 2018-2019

33 Coastal Region Projects 2018-2019

55 Columbia Region Projects 2018-2019

30 Peace Region Projects 2018-2019

Manage Your Grant

If you were approved for a grant in 2018–2019, use this link to manage your current grant.

We’re preparing user guides to make it easier for you to manage your grant. Read our user guide for submitting a change request.

Contact us anytime if you have questions.

 

Manage my grant

Apply For a Grant

Apply now for a fish or wildlife grant.

Review our Coastal, Columbia or Peace Region Action Plans.

Read our 2018 Grant Info Kit.

Register for a Peace Region information session about our grants.

Peace Region grant applicants: Mandatory Notice of Intent is due Friday, September 7, 2018, at 5 p.m. PDT

All grant applications are due by Friday, October 26, 2018 at 5 p.m. PDT.

Apply now

2018-2019 Projects Announced

Our three regional boards – Coastal, Columbia, and Peace – approved funding for 118 fish and wildlife projects, valued at approximately $10 million, for 2018-2019. Each project went through a three-stage review and evaluation process prior to a final decision by our local Boards. Each project addresses one or more conservation priorities in our Action Plans. See our project map. Visit our inter-active project maps for our Coastal, Columbia and Peace regions.

Learn more about why we’re funded by BC Hydro, the projects we fund, and how you can apply for a grant, by reading our FAQ’s below. Subscribe and we will keep you posted on project updates, results, grant deadlines and FWCP events. Final reports and results for all FWCP projects are posted online.

Our annual intake of grant applications opens in August, 2018. Grant applications are due Friday, October 26, 2018.

FAQ

What is the FWCP?

The Fish & Wildlife Compensation Program (FWCP) is a partnership between BC Hydro, the Province of B.C, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, First Nations, and Public Stakeholders to conserve and enhance fish and wildlife in watersheds impacted by existing BC Hydro dams.

Why does FWCP fund projects?

The FWCP was established to compensate for impacts to fish, wildlife, and their supporting habitat, resulting from the construction of existing BC Hydro dams.

BC Hydro has water licence obligations in the Columbia and Peace regions, and has made voluntary commitments to address the impacts of dams in the Coastal Region. BC Hydro fulfills the applicable obligations through the work of the FWCP.

The FWCP is funded annually by BC Hydro. The FWCP directs those funds towards projects that address priority actions across its three regions to fulfill its mission, and work towards its vision of thriving fish and wildlife populations in watersheds that are functioning and sustainable.

Who decides what projects get FWCP funding?

We fund projects that align with our Action Plans, which reflect regional conservation priorities and priority actions. An independent Board in each region reviews all grant applications and project funding decisions. Our Boards include representatives from BC Hydro, the Province of B.C., Fisheries and Oceans Canada, First Nations and Public Stakeholders.

Learn more about our grants and projects we fund at fwcp.ca. Subscribe at fwcp.ca/subscribe.

How is the FWCP funded?

The Fish & Wildlife Compensation Program (FWCP) conserves and enhances fish and wildlife in watersheds impacted by BC Hydro dams. The FWCP is funded annually by BC Hydro. The FWCP directs those funds towards priority actions across its three regions to fulfill its mission and work towards its vision of thriving fish and wildlife populations in watersheds that are functioning and sustainable.

By funding projects to support fish and wildlife populations in our Coastal, Columbia and Peace Regions, the FWCP is fulfilling BC Hydro’s applicable water licence obligations and voluntary commitments to compensate for fish and wildlife impacts.

What does the FWCP fund?

We fund and support the following types of actions, which are consistent with our mandate:

  1. actions to create, restore, or otherwise improve the function of ecosystems that have been impacted by BC Hydro activities;
  2. actions to create, restore, or otherwise improve the function of alternate ecosystems that provide a better opportunity for investment;
  3. specific management actions for species of interest, as identified by recovery teams and action/implementation groups;
  4. baseline inventories that contribute to the development of habitat- or species-based actions within our Action Plans;
  5. monitoring programs designed to measure the effectiveness of FWCP-funded habitat and species actions;
  6. actions that contribute to all aspects of managing co-operatively managed conservation lands; and
  7. participation as a team member in species of interest planning.

What does the FWCP NOT fund?

We do not fund or support the following activities, which are beyond our mandate:

  1. core activities of government or non-government agencies or programs (i.e. if the proposed project is being undertaken to inform a specific regulatory or legislative requirement, it is considered a core activity of government);
  2. programs designed exclusively to address government harvest objectives;
  3. policy development related to land or wildlife management;
  4. administration of government regulations;
  5. leading the development of species recovery goals;
  6. funding, coordinating, or leading National Recovery Teams for species at risk; and
  7. engaging in enforcement and compliance activities, except in relation to co-operatively managed conservation lands.

When are grant applications due?

All grant applications are due Friday, October 26, 2018 at 5 p.m. PDT. All grant applicants must apply online at fwcp.ca/apply-for-funding. We do not accept grant applications by email or Canada Post.

If you are applying for a grant in our Peace Region, you must have submitted a mandatory Notice of Intent by Friday, September 7, 2018 at 5 p.m. PDT.

What projects are eligible for a grant?

Actions identified in our Action Plans are eligible for an FWCP grant. Our Action Plans define priority actions for each watershed or sub-region, and reflect our mission, geographic scope, and three strategic objectives:

  1. conservation;
  2. community engagement; and
  3. sustainable use.

The Action Plans also provide important context about hydro-generating facilities, information gaps, limiting factors, and other information to characterize the watershed or sub-region.

Within our Action Plans, priority actions are grouped by five broad types:

  1. habitat-based actions;
  2. species-based actions;
  3. research and information acquisition actions;
  4. monitoring and evaluation actions; and
  5. land securement.

Our Action Plans also identify how important each action is to us (i.e. priority #1, #2, or #3). A priority #1 action will score higher than a priority #2 or #3 action, when grant applications are evaluated. Actions identified as “directed” are not eligible for a grant. These are projects that our regional Boards will direct through a separate request for proposal process. Do not submit a grant application for a “directed” project. Contact us if you are not sure.

Grant applications for projects that do not clearly address a priority action identified in an Action Plan will not be considered for an FWCP grant.

Who can apply for an FWCP grant?

Any group, government agency, First Nation, business, or individual that can meet our mandatory requirements (e.g. WorkSafeBC and commercial general liability insurance) is eligible to receive an FWCP grant. In the past, First Nations, municipal, provincial, or federal agencies, stewardship groups, consultants, and educational institutions have been approved for FWCP grants.

What grants are available?

We offer three different grants for fish and wildlife projects.

 

  1. Seed Grant

Our Seed Grant is available if you have a project idea and need financial support to further develop it before submitting a Large Grant application. Seed Grant funding is intended to offset costs to fill information gaps, explore project feasibility, and prepare technical information. Up to a maximum of $5,000 is available from the FWCP. See below for details on how a Comox Valley Seed Grant helped launch important habitat restoration work.

 

  1. Small Grant

Our Small Grant is available for projects that align with our Action Plans and have a total project cost of less than $20,000. The total project cost includes funding from all sources including, but not limited to, the FWCP, other funders (if any), the total value of all in-kind contributions (if any), and applicable taxes. Your Small Grant application does not require a written project proposal.

 

  1. Large Grant

Our Large Grant is available for projects that align with our Action Plans and have a total project cost of more than $20,000. The total project cost includes funding from all sources including, but not limited to, the FWCP, other funders (if any), and the total value of all in-kind contributions (if any), and applicable taxes. Your Large Grant application must include a written project proposal (maximum six pages).

 

How do I apply for a grant in 2018?

We use an online grant management system to manage all aspects of your FWCP grant, starting with your grant application. Access our online grant management system at fwcp.ca/apply-for-funding.

It’s easy to apply for an FWCP grant:

  1. Review the regional Action Plans of interest to you.
  2. Develop a project idea to fulfill an action in any Action Plan(s);
  3. Login to our online grant management system at fwcp.ca/apply-for-funding;
  4. Complete your mandatory Notice of Intent by September 7, 2018, 5 p.m. PDT (Peace Region only);
  5. Start your online grant application;
  6. Fulfill all mandatory grant application requirements; and
  7. Submit your grant application by Friday, October 26, 2018, 5 p.m. PDT.

Contact us anytime if you have questions.

When do I apply for a grant?

Our annual intake of grant applications is now open. Grant applications are due Friday, October 26, 2018.

Subscribe at fwcp.ca/subscibe and we will keep you posted.

 

What are the 2018 Coastal Region priorities and/or requirements for grants?

Regional priorities and/or requirements for 2018 grant intake vary slightly. See below.

Review our Coastal Region Action Plans
Action Plans for the 14 watersheds that make up our Coastal Region are now online. These Action Plans identify our conservation priorities and actions eligible for an FWCP grant.

2018 Coastal Region priorities
The Coastal Region Board is interested in funding priority actions in each of the 14 watersheds that make up our Coastal Region, especially actions identified as priority #1.

 

Submit letters of support for Large Grants
Mandatory letters of support are required for all Large Grant applications (i.e. projects with a total cost of more than $20,000). A letter of support is required from:

  1. a government agency;
  2. a First Nation; and
  3. a stakeholder/community group.

Letters of support for Seed or Small Grants are optional and may be used to strengthen your grant application.

Applying for a fish passage project?
If you are applying for a grant to evaluate opportunities to improve fish passage and restore fish production above BC Hydro facilities, you are required to work through the Fish Passage Decision Framework. Grant applicants are encouraged to contact BC Hydro at alexis.hall@bchydro.com for support in working through the Fish Passage Decision Framework.

Contact us if you are proposing a project near select reservoirs
If you are proposing a project in the Ash, Campbell, Jordan, or Puntledge River watersheds, you MUST contact our Coastal Region Manager, Julie Fournier, at julie.fournier@bchydro.com or 604-528-7998, prior to submitting your grant application. There are large private land holdings in each of these watersheds, and as a result there is an additional project screening process.

Projects must be within our Coastal Region watersheds
We fund projects to be delivered within the boundaries of the 14 watersheds that make up our Coastal Region.

What are the 2018 Columbia Region priorities and/or requirements for grants?

Regional priorities and/or requirements for 2018 grant intake vary slightly. See below.

The FWCP’s Columbia Region Board is encouraging grant applications for proposed projects that align with its Action Plans and result in “on-the-ground” or “in-stream” restoration and enhancement. Grant applications that address one or more of the Columbia Region priorities outlined below will receive additional points during the evaluation process.

  1. Project involves implementation of stream habitat restoration and enhancement activities. Refer to FWCP Columbia Streams Action Plan. Restoration and enhancement projects with adequate technical background are preferred over inventory, research and planning. Applicants are encouraged to make use of any existing stream restoration plans (e.g. Forest/Fisheries Renewal BC; see env.gov.bc.ca/ecocat/).
  2. Project involves implementation of riparian and wetland restoration and conservation activities identified in the FWCP Columbia Wetland and Riparian Action Plan.
  3. The fish and/or wildlife project will be delivered within the northern portion of the FWCP Columbia area (“North Columbia”), which is bordered by Revelstoke and Golden in the south, and Valemount in the north. Proposed projects must also align with priorities outlined in FWCP Columbia Action Plans.

Follow our guidance for fisheries projects in our Columbia Region
If you are proposing a fisheries project in our Columbia Region, please review the Columbia Region Annual Ongoing Fisheries Program Five-Year Plan (2018 – 2023) to ensure your proposal does not duplicate activities already planned. Applications for projects that duplicate the FWCP’s annual and ongoing fisheries projects will not be considered for funding.

Letters of support are optional
Letters of support from a government agency, First Nation, or stakeholder/community group are optional for Columbia Region grant applicants. However, they can be used to strengthen your grant application.

Projects must be within our Columbia Region
We fund projects to be delivered within the boundaries of our Columbia Region, which includes the Canadian portion of the Columbia River Basin, plus our wildlife extension area (northwest of Valemount). The Canadian portion of the Flathead River Basin is not part of our Columbia Region.

What are the 2018 Peace Region priorities and/or requirements for grants?

Regional priorities and/or requirements for 2018 grant intake vary slightly. See below.

Submit your mandatory Notice of Intent by September 7, 2018
If you are applying for a fish or wildlife grant in our Peace Region, you must submit a mandatory Notice of Intent (NOI) by Friday, September 7, 2018, by 5 p.m. PDT.

The NOI is an important part of our commitment to First Nations. It helps inform First Nations about your proposed project, and is the basis for identifying opportunities for First Nations’ perspectives and involvement in your project. The NOI helps our Peace Region Manager, Chelsea Coady, provide you with additional guidance before completing your grant application.

Follow our guidance for contacting First Nations
Your NOI will be reviewed by our First Nations Working Group and you will receive notice by email advising you to contact specific First Nations in our Peace Region to discuss your proposed project.

  1. We expect your initial contact with specific First Nations will occur well in advance of the grant application deadline (i.e. within one week of receiving written notice of the First Nations you have been directed to contact).
  2. Initial contact will be via email and include the following information clearly and concisely:
    1. map of project location;
    2. an overview of the project’s expected objectives or research questions (one to two sentences);
    3. a summary paragraph outlining your proposed approach and timelines (three to four sentences); and
    4. your initial intentions for First Nations involvement in your project (two to three sentences).

When you hear back from your First Nations’ contacts, use these points to guide your next discussion:

  1. First Nations priorities’ and values: Discuss specific priorities and values for the First Nations and identify how this information can be incorporated into the project scope.
  2. Community activity timelines: Discuss the timelines of the project activities relative to traditional, cultural, or community activities, and how to ensure there is no conflict between activities.
  3. Traditional knowledge: Discuss if there are opportunities to incorporate traditional and local knowledge into the project scope.
  4. Training opportunities: Discuss and determine First Nations’ training opportunities related to the project (e.g. electrofishing certification). Costs associated with First Nations’ training can be included as a budget line item in the project application.
  5. Employment approach: Discuss preferred approach to hiring First Nations’ members who may be involved in the project and determine appropriate daily rates for First Nations (e.g. hiring members on an individual basis or hiring through the First Nation or a First Nation-owned company).
  6. Level of involvement: FWCP encourages meaningful involvement of First Nations to strengthen and maintain relationships with First Nations. FWCP has defined four types of relationships or support by First Nations:
    1. Financial or in-kind support – A First Nation contributes funds or in-kind services that increase the total value of the project;
    2. Support in principle – A First Nation provides a letter of support for the project but is not directly involved in the project;
    3. Working relationship – Budgeted involvement in the project (e.g. First Nations’ technicians employed through the project).
    4. Project development support – A First Nation contributes to project development and implementation.

When completing your online grant application, you will be required to indicate the level of First Nation involvement in your project.

Follow our guidance for Arctic Grayling projects
The FWCP funds Arctic Grayling projects that align with our 2017 Arctic Grayling synthesis report and monitoring framework. These documents identify high-priority information gaps and monitoring needs related to Arctic Grayling. These monitoring needs must be undertaken prior to funding on-the-ground conservation and enhancement projects, and include:

  1. acquiring population data;
  2. identifying critical habitats; and
  3. assessing potential limiting factors.

Grant applications for projects to conserve and enhance Arctic Grayling in our Peace Region must align with our Streams Action Plan (Actions 1b-3 and 1b-4), and the monitoring needs in the synthesis report and monitoring framework.

Letters of support are optional
Letters of support from a government agency, First Nation, or stakeholder/community group are optional for Peace Region grant applicants. They are encouraged and can be used to strengthen your grant application.

Follow our guidance for fish passage restoration projects
The Peace Region Board acknowledges that fish passage restoration projects are a significant investment, therefore, the Board encourages grant applications for restoration projects where an initial investment (e.g. initial planning and assessment phases) has occurred and/or where investment by others is demonstrated.

Grant applications for fish passage restoration projects should consider and demonstrate the following:

  1. demonstrate your project follows the four-phased approach outlined in the provincial Fish Passage Strategic Approach: Protocol for Prioritizing Sites for Fish Passage Remediation;
  2. demonstrate that the stream crossing(s) you would restore through your project does not have current ownership and is “orphaned.” Note: This does not exclude opportunities for FWCP investment in a project to remediate a length of stream with crossings that have orphaned status, and other crossings that have current ownership. In this scenario, other funding would be required for the restoration for the currently- owned crossings (i.e. FWCP funds will not be approved for crossings that are currently-owned);
  3. demonstrate partnerships and participation with stakeholders, the provincial Fish Passage Technical Working Group, and First Nations;
  4. demonstrate leveraged funding to increase the value of the FWCP investment (i.e. other in-kind and cash contributions);
  5. demonstrate the quantity and value of the habitat that will be gained by the project and the species that will benefit (e.g. X kms, for which species, and the type of habitat available above the obstruction). Note: The Fish Passage Technical Working Group should be contacted to determine access to the province’s GIS modeling approach to assess fish habitat;
  6. identify the priority for fish passage restoration within the proposed location (e.g. species of interest presence, overall benefit to the watershed, etc.); and
  7. consider lower cost options to improve fish passage (e.g. implementing baffles to backwater culverts) in lieu of implementing culvert replacement projects if supported by the Fish Passage Technical Working Group.

Projects must occur within, or relate to, our Peace Region
We fund projects to be delivered within the boundaries of our Peace Region. We may fund projects that only partially overlap with our region boundary if the project is related to a species that moves across the regional boundary (e.g. caribou herds). Additionally, projects with a strong community engagement or stewardship and education focus could have some, but not all, project components outside of our regional boundary. These projects must still demonstrate they are addressing a priority action in a Peace Region Action Plan.

What's in a grant application?

Overview of online grant applications and the questions you will be required to answer.

Description
Project summary: project title, project summary statement, and project urgency.
Project details: species that will benefit, detailed project description.
Applicant information: proponent organization, project contact, signing authority, add collaborators, project partners, project volunteers.

Project info
Project location information: location description, project coordinates (latitude and longitude).
Alignment with Action Plan(s): primary Action Plan, primary project type, priority action, how will project address priority action, secondary Action Plan alignment.
Single or multi-year project: define project duration, and provide overview of project achievements and challenges for ongoing multi-year projects.
Project phases: start-up, fieldwork, data entry and analysis, draft reporting, community engagement, final reporting.
Benefits: benefits to fish or wildlife, benefits to First Nations, stakeholders, and/or communities.
Permits and approval: BC Hydro-owned lands, proximity to BC Hydro facility, landowners, required permits, and approvals.

Project budget
Budget: labour expenses, materials/equipment/transportation and field expenses, other funding sources, total project cost, total FWCP grant requested.
Funding: is this a resubmission of a previously “not approved” application? Have you previously received FWCP funding?

Proposal and letters of support
Project proposal, letters of support (see regional requirements and/ or priorities).

Experience
Project contact experience: experience and credentials.
Other team members experience: roles, credentials/qualification.

Action Plan alignment
We fund projects that align with our Action Plans. When completing your online grant application you will have to identify which Action Plan(s) your proposed project aligns with (i.e. a primary and optional secondary Action Plan, not objectives or sub-objectives).

We recognize that your project idea may align with several Action Plans and priority actions. Contact us if you are not sure and want to discuss aligning your project idea with our Action Plan priorities.

Multi-year projects
A multi-year project is a project that will span more than one fiscal year before being complete.

You can only apply for one year of project funding at a time, even if your proposed project will span multiple years. You must apply for funding annually for proposed multi-year projects.

Approval of annual FWCP funding for a multi-year project does not guarantee FWCP funding in future years.

Project phases
In the project information part of the grant application, you’ll be asked to outline the details and timelines for work that will occur in five project phases:

  1. project start-up;
  2. data entry and analysis;
  3. draft reporting;
  4. community engagement; and
    • We’re looking for details on how you plan to share your project details, including results and what you’ve learned, with others (i.e. fish and wildlife stakeholders, First Nations, the public, technical experts, etc.), and any details on how others may be involved in your project (i.e. volunteers).
  5. final reporting.

Project budget
Our grant application will provide you with an online budget template to complete.

  1. Your budget should include all components of the project (e.g. start up, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation, etc.) that the FWCP or another funder is covering.
  2. All labour rates must be expressed as day rates (and include all applicable taxes).
  3. Be sure to note the acceptable per diem and mileage rates noted in the budget template (i.e. mileage $0.54/km, breakfast $11, lunch $14 and dinner $26, all day per diem $51).
  4. In-kind and volunteer contributions are to be expressed as: $250/day for skilled labour; $100 for unskilled labour (standard day = 8 hours); standard charge out rates for professionals.
  5. Provision of data, technical drawings, etc., from BC Hydro and other organizations should not be assumed. Costs associated for such requests should be included in the project budget (e.g. $350/day).
  6. Any administration costs that the FWCP is asked to cover cannot exceed 10% of the total FWCP is being asked to fund in the “labour and materials” sections of the budget.
  7. If your grant application is approved, you will be expected to report on total actual expenditures against the FWCP projected budget that you submit in your online grant application. Please structure your proposed budget with this type of reporting in mind.

Total project value/cost
Total project cost includes funding from all sources (including, but not limited to, the FWCP), as well as the value of in-kind and volunteer contributions and all applicable taxes.

Submit a written proposal with your Large Grant application
A written proposal (maximum six pages) is mandatory for all Large Grant applicants.
The written proposal should include background and context for the proposed project, the risks of proceeding with the project, literature cited, and accurate and functioning links to online sources. Optional photos and/or a map of the project site are encouraged.

Letters of support
Three letters of support are mandatory in the Coastal Region for large grant applications.
Three letters of support are encouraged in the Columbia and Peace Regions, but they are not mandatory.

Letters of support (three in total) should be from each of the following:

  1. Government agency;
  2. First Nation; and
  3. Stakeholder/community group.

The three letters should clearly indicate their support for the project and how the project is relevant to the author.

Experience
We request information about the credentials, qualifications, and roles of key project team members that will participate in the proposed project. The FWCP no longer collects résumés from team members during the initial submission of your grant application. We may ask for résumés as a condition for approval.

 

How are grant applications reviewed and evaluated?

All grant applications go through a three-stage review process that ends with a final decision by each Regional Board about proposed projects in each of our three regions.

Stage 1            Review by Regional Manager
Each FWCP regional manager reviews grant applications to ensure they are complete and in alignment with priority actions in our Action Plans.

In our Peace Region, the First Nations Working Group (FNWG) reviews all Notices of Intent (NOI) received by the September 7, 2018 5 p.m. PDT, deadline. When this review is complete, the regional manager will advise all Peace Region grant applicants which First Nations they are expected to contact about the proposed project and any other applicable regional guidance.

Stage 2            Review by technical committees and First Nations Working Group 
Fish and wildlife technical committees in each region review each grant application for technical merit. In our Peace Region, the First Nations Working Group also evaluates grant applications for inclusion of traditional ecological knowledge, incorporation of First Nation cultural values, and involvement of First Nations in the proposed project, where appropriate.

Results from the technical committees and First Nations Working Group (Peace Region) review are provided to each Board to assist in their review and final decision-making in Stage 3.

Stage 3            Review by Board members
The three regional Boards review each grant application for projects proposed in their region. The Boards consider the results of all Stage 2 evaluations and make final decisions on which grant applications will be approved with conditions. The regional Boards evaluate the grant applications and are responsible for all project and funding decisions in each region.

 

How are grant applications evaluated?
During Stage 2 of our review process, the FWCP’s fish and wildlife Technical Committees in each region review all grant applications and evaluate them for:

  1. Alignment with the FWCP’s strategic objectives (e.g. conservation, sustainable use, and community engagement) and investment criteria.
  2. Alignment with priority actions in our Action Plans.
    • In each Action Plan, every action has been assigned a priority of #1 (highest), #2, or #3. During the evaluation of grant applications, a proposed project that aligns with a priority #1 action will be awarded more points, and a proposed project for a priority #2 or #3 action will receive fewer points.
  3. Conservation and enhancement of fish or wildlife that will result from the proposed project.
    4. Overall quality of the grant application.
    5. Technical merit, feasibility, and likelihood of success.
    6. Deliverables and project outcomes.
    7. Team qualifications and experience.
    8. Cost-effectiveness.
    9. Innovation and creativity.

In our Peace Region, our First Nations Working Group also reviews each grant application at Stage 2 and evaluates each one for:

  1. effective communication with First Nations about the proposed project prior to submitting a grant application;
  2. partnership, training, or participation opportunities; and
  3. recognition and inclusion of cultural values and traditional knowledge.

During Stage 3 of our review process, our Regional Boards review each grant application and consider the results of other evaluations, their evaluation of the grant application, and the balancing of priorities including, but not limited to, the:

  1. balance between projects that benefit primarily fish or wildlife;
  2. balance of projects between Action Plans;
  3. value of funding fewer high-cost, single-year projects or a several smaller-cost projects; and
  4. impact of multi-year funding on future year projects.

The Boards’ review and evaluation considers each grant application relative to the FWCP’s strategic objectives: conservation, sustainable use, and community engagement. Board members in each region review all grant applications and evaluate them for:

  1. the benefit of the proposed project to fish or wildlife, and ecosystems, impacted by BC Hydro dams;
  2. alignment with annual regional priorities or regional guidance;
    • Additional points will be awarded during the evaluation process to applications that address one or more of the three Columbia Region priorities.
  3. likelihood of improving or maintaining opportunities for sustainable use;
    4. overall value of the project including, but not limited to, partnerships with First Nations and other funding partners, in-kind contributions, and volunteers;
    5. engagement of First Nations, public, community and local stakeholders; and
    6. overall quality of the grant application.

 

 

What happens if my grant application is approved?

All grant applicants will be notified of Board decisions by March 2019.

If your grant application is approved, you will be notified in writing of all conditions that must be fulfilled before finalizing a contribution agreement, starting work on your proposed project, and receiving the first payment instalment. The conditions are determined by the regional Boards, and vary by grant application and proposed project.

All approved grant applicants will be required to fulfil our mandatory requirements (e.g. WorkSafeBC and general commercial liability coverage).

Read our information kit for approved grant applicants. It will be revised and posted online prior to notifying grant applicants about our Boards’ funding decisions in February 2019. Contact us anytime.

Community Engagement Grants

Our Community Engagement Grant is typically $500 to $1,000 and helps stewardship groups and others take action to benefit local fish and wildlife.

Looking For Other Funders?

We’re sharing a few sources of environmental funding here, but we know there are many more. Please share your funding sources with us so we can share them with others who are also working to conserve and enhance fish and wildlife.